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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 71 (some duplicates have been removed)
regional power in india, that the united states may not appreciate in the long run. and, of course, the invasion of iraq has destroyed the iraq power, they're forgetting nuclear weapons. iran is the dominant conventional military force in the region. if the united states is there. the united states as its policies to withdraw from iraq, the potential for iran to fill the vacuum is extremely high. that in turn changes the balance of power, orderlies the political dynamic in the arabian peninsula. there are finally important decisions to be made. on the one hand, the united states must rebalance its global policy to deal with issues like russia, to deal with china and so on. at the same time the united states can't simply withdraw, it doesn't have the ability to simply exit and doesn't have an endgame in any of these areas. so we have a very powerful nation, much less possible it might be another circumstances because it's so off-balance. >> host: that's where i was really surprised in a way to look at where you're taking the consequences in that analysis. let's take those three that
to go to the religious authority to get sanction. in india, you are ton sand if -- sanity if id by a brahman. that's what we mean by rule of law. the only world civilization that did not have rule of law is china. the reason, they never had a central religion. it's amazing to think they got primitive because of a religion. you only have to worship your ancestors. there's really no authority that comes from that. it was completely controlled by the state. no chinese emperor has ever felt there's a higher source of law to obey. that continues to the present day. the chinese party does a constitution. they make the constitution. the constitution doesn't limit what they want to do. in the west, rule of law develops very early and very powerfully. one the heros in my book, the classic all like the reformation. i like the catholic church in a couple of important historical respects. in terms of the rule of law, the church was extremely important. in the post period, in the early middle ages, bishops and priest could marry and vice president children. they all ought to turn the benefit
on russia and india, and there are demands for lower trade restrictions. >> terrace have to be lowered in countries such as -- tariffs have to be lowered in countries such as india. >> german cacar makers are investing in the development of fuel-efficient models. more and more consumers, especially in urban areas, are choosing greener cars. the german automotive industry has been working tords the development of alternative injuns. >> it is an intensive endeavor. alternative engines include fuel cell and hydrogen as well. we're working on all of these. no one knows which of these technologies will be the most economical. >> that is why german car makers are investing in research and development. >> of the months ago, the ceo of deutsche telecom said he was serious about putting women in top positions in any company. two women have been appointed to the management board. one is of former kinsey executive, and a former state education minister has been appointed to the board position overseeing human resources. up until now, the eight-person board was exclusively composed of men. and ont
about drone strikes, u.s. relations with india and the presence of osama bin laden in his country before his killing last spring. the former pakistani president plans to return to pakistan next year to seek the presidency in 2013. he recently spoke at the woodrow wilson center for about an hour. [inaudible conversations] >> good morning and welcome to the wilson center. and for many of you, including president musharraf, welcome back to the wilson center. i understand we have overflow crowds in numerous rooms befitting an important visitor and an important speech. my name is jane harman, i am the relatively new -- three months into it -- president and ceo of the wilson center. i'm a recovering politician. [laughter] having spent nine months -- nine months, nine terms in the united states congress, some would say and i would agree that my timing in terms of leaving was impeccable. [laughter] this is the second time that the center has hosted a public address by the former president of pakistan, pervez musharraf, a fact that underscores the center's intense interest in pakistan and its com
and 1971 wars against india allied pakistan with the united states in, what i believe, was the misnamed war on terror. certainly it was a war against al qaeda and president musharraf was our ally. he allowed u.s. troops access to pakistan military bases and airports as well as other support. it was, and remains, a turbulent time. the good news was the serious effort in educational reform and these things that are now stalled because of a more recent development. the embarrassing news was the discovery in 2005 that the father of pakistan's nuclear bomb sold technology to north korea and elsewhere. then there were the protests by the legal community about the below the -- validity of the 2007 election and the horrifying assassination of bhutto. events since have been more challenging. the takedown of osama bin laden, something that we all applaud, has exposed deep conflicts. the government recently ordered 200 special forces trainers to leave the country which resulted in a suspension by the obama white house of $800 million in u.s. military aid. yesterday, congress has taken a more severe po
believe that is true. some years ago i went to india and interviewed a boss there. he was a social i-and party had been in charge of that parts of india for years but despite the poverty he should have seen all around him, he said the free market and american capitalism are no good. >> political boss of india that i visited, it's not surprising this is the poorest part of country. >> it's poor because of your stupid policy, no? >> socialism just works better? >> that interview was done years ago. he and his party continued to rule and plan for another dozen years only this may after indian voters got upset watching businesses and jobs flee to other parts of india did they vote the socialist government out, overwhelmingly. but the socialists ruled for decades because central planning makes sense to people. life is complex we can't pay attention to everybody. we have lives. of our intuition tells us someone should be in charge. what would be the economy be like if no one was in charge? well, it would be pretty good actually. certainly better than one is centrally planned. look at this
this... medicare guide and customized rate quote. bill: breaking news by way of mumbai, india, formerly bombay. two explosions heard a short time ago. this is the town that was racked by the terrorist attack a few years back when the taj mahal hotel was attacked by terrorists that were later traced to pakistan. so many killed that day inside that hotel. two loud explosions moment ago in mumbai. we are looking for information on where this happened if there are any villag -- if there are . alisyn: news corp, the parent company of fox news has withdrawn its bid to take over the u.k.'s largest pay tv broadcasters. amy kellogg is live in london. what many the latest, amy? >> news corp has dropped its bid to buy the remaining shares. that doesn't mean news corp won't revisit the plan down the road. news corp issuing a statement saying it believes the aquestion sick by news corporation would have been beneficial to both companies. but it's becoming clear in the current climate it's too difficult to pursue this deal. now, this morning there was a lively debate in the parliament about this. the
quite progressively. in fact, the deal for a $7 billion investment into reliance industry in india, it was clear last friday, hit all three exploration blocks but 21, they're hoping it pays off in the near future. they have challenges in russia. as you know, they've been trying to go into the arctic with a new partner. that's still tied up in the courts in russia. we don't know the payback in russia. so far, as of last week, he's moving aggressively because he's picked up new fields in the caribbean which he thinks are going to hold big promise for deep water. again, he's moved aggressively. he's an american ceo but a british company trying to turn things around. the payback hasn't come just yet. it's interesting to know the peak of the stock came two weeks before the spill and we're down 27% from the peak of 2010. so he had the wind in his sails then. >> and 2.5% today actually. >> yeah. so we're looking at a 27% drop before the results came up today. the real proof in fuding is what's going to happen in the year forward. can he get the new contracts in india to produce? can the r
to say a few words about today's bombings in mumbai, india. we condemn these disparate -- despicable acts of violence designed to provoke fear. those who perpetrated them must know they cannot succeed. the indian people have suffered from acts of terrorism before, and we have seen them respond with courage and resilience. we are continuing to monitor the situation including the safety and security of american citizens. at our hearts are with the victims and their families. we have reached out to the indian government to express our condolences and offer support. i will be traveling to india next week as planned. i believe it is more important than ever that we stand with india, dig deep, and reaffirm our commitment to the shared struggle against terrorism. neither of our countries, the russian federation or the united states, are unfortunately strangers to terrorism. it has been a mutual goal of both of our presidents to increase our cooperation in order to prevent terrorists from wreaking their violence on innocent russians, americans, and others come and to bring those who do so to just
foreign investment every month were india takes it in over -- every year and they only grow 2% faster than india. it is not as impressive as it appears. massive investment, a huge number of airports, highways, high-speed rail. if you look at what you are getting out of it in terms of the return of investment, not as investment. china has a huge problem that they face. the u.n. can out with a report that pointed out that china will have a demographic collapse of the next 25 years. they will lose 400 million people. there is no point in human history in which you have had a dominant power in the world that is also declining demographically. it simply does not happen. if you want to look at what a country in demographic decline looks like, look at japan. how powerful is it? politically, even if china is the largest economy in the world, and those numbers are all based on purchasing power parity where there gdp gets inflated because the cost of a hair cut is less than one in toronto, but your international power does not depend on the price of hair cuts but foreign aid, oil, and international
. we had our reasons for abstaining. together with india, brazil, china, and russia -- the decision has now been made. we continue to stand by our resolve that germany will not send any combat troops as part of a military mission in libya. >> germany's preing for a seat on the security council, is that realistic? >> it isn't so much about germany or europe's wish for a permanent seat on the security council. reforming the united nations is primarily about adapting the architecture of the un to reality. the current makeup of the security council and of the united nations itself largely reflects the distribution of power and the political situation at the end of world wawar ii. the fact that latin america has no permanent representation on the security council, that africa has no permanent representative, that asia is so unr-represented, these things are no less significant than our offer as germans to take on more permanent responsibility on the security council.. >> the german foreign minister, thank you very m much r talking to us. that has been our "in depth." you can logon to our web
was certified to care yea maximum of 120 people. >>> tragedy in northern india. rescuers are pulling more bodies from the wreckage of a passenger train that derailed. the number of confirmed dead climbed to 67. and many more bodies are believed to be trapped under the twisted coaches. >>> smash the record of 106 topping off at 110. >> hot and hume night so far just hot air. >> that's been the case dangerously hot weather in the mid-section of the nation. oklahoma city and omaha uncomfortable. milwaukee -- in mill walkee -- in milwaukee, they had to call of a a marathon after runners collapsed. we are only three weeks into summer. >> did he say 106? >> i think he did. >> oh. >> it's been hot here so maybe we shouldn't complain. >> that's high. it has been hot here especially. but that is a kind of hot reserved for places. >> elsewhere. >> 106? justin. >> yeah. i don't want to see 106. if anything, in my oven and that's not even warm enough there. but let's leave it there. you don't want to get an idea of the heat. this morning, these are current temperatures. 5:00 eastern time, so we are central
pipeline, iran-pakistan-india. the u.s. state department stood up and said, this is not going to happen. does it go through anyway as a litmus test? >> i think what was unfortunate is the problem between india and pakistan, that they didn't want -- on continuedian side to rely on the gas on going through pakistan. they thought maybe it should be offshore and so on. i think as far as iran and pakistan is concerned or the two are concerned, the deal is going quite a long way ahead on the iranian side. on the pakistani side there is so many announcements. of course, over 20 years, announcements are announcements, but they seem a bit more serious. >> pipeline politics indeed. it's become a major source of contention between lebanon and israel. they're warning israel to stay away from the country's energy resources but leaders of the hezbollah group calls on them for an energy exploration. maritime dispute over who owns what are escalating already heightened tensions between two countries. we take a special look. >> reporter: under the warm waters of the mediterranean may lie treasures yet u
of the calgary the british brought all the way from india, the famous lancers from germany -- maybe i could get a glass or a bottle of water? when the germans invaded france 1914, then they did so with eight calvary divisions prepare you could just imagine how little chance and then with the age of modern weaponry. everybody practiced for the great cavalry charges and they anticipated what is white knights in armor with a jousting competition. the idea of war was very close to the day's close aligned to images of sport like this. the first correspondent of the london daily mail was the sport center. of course, when they tried to do the mass of charges they come up against barbwire not to mention the machine good. -- machine again. and as a result of those two weapons of the british writer and a machine gun, the western front where most of the bloodshed took place was essentially frozen in place along that line with more than three years. and barely more than a few miles in each direction. in the entire year 1915 where the allies launched -- launched massive assaults probably altogether 1 millio
explosion in india. >>> the heat is back on. how much longer will it last? stick around for the update the -- updated first warning weather forecast. medicare. it doesn't cover everything. and what it doesn't cover can cost you some money. that's why you should consider an aarp... medicare supplement insurance plan... insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. all medicare supplement insurance plans can help pay... some of what medicare doesn't, so you could save... thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket expenses. call now for this free information kit and medicare guide. if you're turning 65 or you're already on medicare... you should know about this card -- it's the only one of its kind endorsed by aarp; see if it's right for you. all medicare supplement plans let you keep your own doctor, or hospital that accepts medicare. there are no networks and no referrals needed. help protect yourself from some of what medicare doesn't pay... and save up to thousands of dollars in potential... out-of-pocket expenses with an aarp... medicare supplement insurance plan... insured by unitedheal
the armies had them. indian calvary that the british brought all the way from india to the western front. the famous luan lancers from germany. maybe i could get a glass of water or a bottle of water or something, if there is one. when the germans invaded france in 1914, the they did so with eight calvary divisions, 40,004 -- horses and you can just imagine how little chance a massive calvary charge had with, you know in the age of modern weaponry. nonetheless everybody practice for the great calvary charges like this british soldier who was drilling here. they anticipated a war that would almost be like knights in armor, like adjusting competition. the idea ideal for -- thanks. the idea of war was very closely allied to images of sport like this. in fact, the first correspondent of the london daily mail sent to the front in 1914 was it sports editor. and of course when they try to do these masses calvary charges they come up against barbed wire, not to mention the machine gun. and of course these ended the days of masses -- massive calvary charges forever. as a result of those two weapo
india, china, and russia are making big strides in their space program. randall? >> terrell brown at the kennedy space center. thanks, terrell. >>> let's get more now on this morning's historic landing from cbs's space consultant bill harwood. good morning, bill. >> good moving, randall. >> the shuttle comes to an end after three decades. what in your opinion have been the most significant accomplishments? >> you know, when you look back over the 30 years the shuttle has been operating, it's hard to pin down any one thing. they demonstrated the use of a reusable spacecraft, the only one ever built and this was the only spacecraft that ever gave anyone a chance to go work on the satellite, retrieve it as we saw with the hubble space telescope, the ability to repair it and turn it into one of the world's premier observatories. i think all the mechanisms they did to make it work will be the remembered as the hallmark of the shuttle program, plus, randall, the sheer grandeur of watching it take off, the sheer rocket boosters and fire and thunder will be things people will miss for yea
they captured the town in 1995. at least 67 people were killed in a train crash in northern india on sunday. police said more than 200 other passengers were injured when the train derailed. rescue he is worked through the night to reach people trapped in the wreckage. the united states' top military officer has expressed concerns thatter iter to the disputes in the south china sea could lead to an unexpected outbreak of violence in the region. admiral mike mullen is on a visit to china, which is embroiled in rowes with the philippines and vietnam about territory. the united states has suspended $800 million of military aid to pakistan. tensions were already high before the al qaeda leader osama bin laden was killed in a u.s. raid in an army raid. more recently, 100 military trainers have been expelled, and they threatened to shut down a c.i.a. base. our correspondent, aleem maqbool, is in islamabad, and earlier, i asked him how humiliating this is for pakistan given they need u.s. aid to help pay for security. >> we keep hearing leaks about various things that the american officials are acc
live in a time where china and brazil and india the galloping economies are the biggest markets in the world. but i like to start off to tell the audiences that today, in the 800 million people of the indicted states and european union produced almost two-thirds of the world's economic output. $14 trillion of sales are generated by these two economies. they employ 4 million people just as europeans do. european investment contributes 10% of new york gdp. when the yorker out of 20 has of job because of the investment from the european union. that leaves the ultimate prize because these two regions are two of the few in the world that really understand what the position of the individual is in society and in government. three down. all of the things that we take for granted are ingrained in the dna. i would submit to you that keeping the relationship strong is extremely important. that is where but i started to think about nato where it is coming from our headed i thought this is not working because it is that relationship that is starting to suffer. as you know, dado was set up
play the role of a talyst. and you know what, when i do my research in india and pakistan, i find people there telling me that you know the way forward is going to be that you people in the west, you muslims living in the west, in north america and europe, you guys might be pave approximating the way. i said really, do you really want us to show you the way, we have a different economic system, different experience. said you can say whatever you want but whatever light are you going to shine on kick-starting the tradition is going to help us. we might not take everything you say. but we are too caught up in our indonesian struggles. and the other thing, charlie that we have in this country. we have possibly the most extraordinary resources, literal resources on islam and muss lim societies that no other country in the world has. e lrary at chicago, harvard's major library, princeton's library has terials an literary resources in arabi, petitionian, turkish, in every language. we have experts that can tell y about details about practices of islam in indonesia to timbuktu. and but t
is still enormously, enormously important. we live in a time where china and brazil and india and so on, the galloping economies are going to be the biggest markets in the world. but i always liked to start off by telling the audiences that today, today the 800 million people of the united states and the european union produced almost two-thirds of the world's economic output. $14 trillion in sales are generated by these two economies they employ 4 million people, just as many americans work for european firms as europeans do for american firms. european investment contributes 10% of new york's gdp. one new yorker out of 20 has a job or her job because of the investment from the european union. so that, to me, is the ultimate prize, the ultimate prize also because these two regions are two of the very few in the world there really understand what the position of an individual is in society and in government. freedom, all of those other things that we take for granted are ingrained in the dna on both sides. and so i would submit to you been keeping their relationship strong is extremely
, city. many companies toured as far away as india, australia, china and as you remember from "the king and i," siam. the play was seen by more people than read the book, although the book it remained extremely popular. and in 1905 "the new york times" said the two most popular books in america are the bible and "uncle tom's cabin." and it kept up a very, very steady presence. the play was seen regularly until about the 1950s and then sporadically after that. there was recently a wonderful staging by alex roe last fall at the metropolitan playhouse in the village. now, in many of those earlier plays uncle tom was falsely presented as a stooped, obedient, old fool. and that's partly where the uncle tom stereotype came from. eva's death in those plays was frequently a syrupy scene in which the actress was hauled heavenward by rope or piano wire against the backdrop of angels and billowing clouds. one might think that such spectacle would defang stowe's revolutionary themes and turn "uncle tom's cabin" into a laughable piece of harmless entertainment, but actually this didn't happen. after
by the u.s. census bureau. using its international database, it projects india to be the most populace nation by the year 2050. take a look at this. they are expecting that india will have 1.6 billion people by 2050, that would make china number two, by the way. i'll show you what china is expected to look like. china would be number two, would be holding steady with about 1.3 billion people. where would the u.s. be? the united states, let me show you that, the united states would grow to about 423 million people by 2050. one of the biggest gains will be number four, this one i'm sure is going to surprise you, nigeria, likely to be the fourth most pew pew his country with 402 million people. look at ethiopia, caught my attention, will be, give that to you, will grow to about 278 million people. putting it into the top ten for the first time. now, those are gainers. let's look at losers. biggest loser, russia would drop from number nine right now to number 16, declining birth rates in that country, relatively low life expectancies to blame. it's just 62 years, by the way, life expectanc
's trip to india was going to cost $2 billion. and he had let it go. he did a wonderful thing, anderson cooper. he'd be constructed the whole story, showed how it began with an unnamed indian official. as if an unnamed indian official would have any idea what the president's trip was going to cost and involved 32 naval ships. this thing was crazy. so he did constructed the whole story. i thought it was so good, i got a transcript and i wrote a column on it, giving him a shout out for doing it. the next day i was giving a talk to the honor society. the first thing a young man said at the table is, did you know obama's trip was going to cost a billion dollars? and i said, did not see anderson cooper? i tell this whole story in the book. and michele bachmann just announced for the presidency. that is utterly irresponsible. >> let me talk about the role of new media. in that case, for example, you can argue that it was because of the internet that spread that story, but even before anderson cooper, there were self correcting mechanisms on the internet. do you think the internet is increasin
crash in india. reports say at least 21 people are dead. more than 100 others hurt after an express train derailed near the city of lucknow in northern india. the train was on its way to new delhi from calcutta when the 12 cars flew off the tracks. no word what caused this. a helicopter crash in tennessee kills two members of the state's national guard and crashed near caryville and knocked out power to thousands of residents and no word what caused that crash. the pilots were in a type of helicopter, called the kiowa helicopter and it's already the subject of a lawsuit over an apartment faulty control system and fighter jets intercept two civilian planes, here we go again near camp david where president obama is staying and the incident happened at separate times. both were escorted to nearby airports without any problems and authorities said the first plane didn't r radio communications and no word why the other plane, a cessna was so close. the third and fourth time that civilian planes approached the retreat. funeral details for former first lady betty ford have been announced.
enough. it's one that has a lot of acceptance in a lot of the world which china, india, brazil, and south africa accept make it work. >> rose: in your opinion china, >> >> yes. >> rose: you came away with what sense of their ambition? >> well, this is clearly a country with an enormous national will to... >> rose: solve internal problems? >> to develop, to become wealthy and powerful and to overcome what they see as a century and a half of national humiliation at the hands of the west. that's a huge drive. how it does that i think this is a country which sees many options and could go several different ways. i mean, the one thing almost everyone you speak in china agrees on the it's not going to have the same system in 20 year's time that it has today. whereas in the united states you think you have basically the same system that you've had for a few centuries and more. >> i think ai wei wei had said this. that you do not expect reform to comele from the generation that's now takingower that replaces hu jintao and wen jiabao but you expect genuine reform to come from the next generation,
as india, australia, china, and as a member from the king and all i. the play was seen by more people than had read the book with the book itself remained extremely popular and in 1905, "the new york times" said the most popular books in america are the bible and uncle tom's cabin, and kept up a steady presence. the play was seen regularly until the 1950's and sporadically after that there was recently a wonderful staging by alex morrow last fall at the metropolitan house in the village to read in many of the earlier plays uncle tom was presented as a stoop to a obedient old fool and that's partly where the uncle tom stereotype came from. eva's death in those plays was a scene in which the actress was hauled heavenward by rope or piano wire against a backdrop of angels in the clouds. one might think such battles and spectacle what defang uncle tom's revolutionary themes and turn uncle tom into a laughable piece of harmless entertainment but actually this didn't happen. after all, the play is about race relations and wickedness of slavery so fema reindell gup many southerners before the war
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 71 (some duplicates have been removed)